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Some basics of Visiting Cards & Business Cards
A visiting card, also known as a calling card, is a small paper card with one's name printed on it. They first appeared in China in the 15th century, and in Europe in the 17th century. The footmen of aristocrat and of royalty would deliver these first European visiting cards to the servants of their prospective hosts solemnly introducing the arrival of their owners.
Business cards are cards bearing business information about a company or individual. They are shared during formal introductions as a convenience and a memory aid. A business card typically includes the giver's name, company affiliation (usually with a logo) and contact information such as street addresses, telephone number(s), fax number, e-mail addresses and website. It can also include telex, bank account, tax code. Traditionally many cards were simple black text on white stock; today a professional business card will sometimes include one or more aspects of striking visual design.
But people in India commonly use the term Visiting Card in the place of  Business card.
Full colour cards, or cards that use many colours, are printed on sheet fed presses as well; however, they use the CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow, and black) four-colour printig process. Screens of each colour overprinted on one another create a wide gamut of colour. The downside to this printing method is that screened colours if examined closely will reveal tiny dots, whereas spot colour cards are printed solid in most cases. Spot colours should be used for simple cards with line art or non-black type that is smaller than 5 points.
A business card can also be coated with a UV glossy coat (offset-uv Printing). The coat is applied just like another ink using an additional unit on a sheet fed press. That being said, UV coats can also be applied as a spot coating - meaning areas can be coated, and other areas can be left uncoated. This creates additional design potential.
When cards are designed, they are given bleeds if color extends to the edge of the finished cut size. (A bleed is the extension of printed lines or colours beyond the line where the paper it is printed on will be cut.) This is to help ensure that the paper will cut without white edges due to very small differences in where the blade cuts the cards, and it is almost impossible to cut the cards properly without. Just being a hair off can result in white lines, and the blade itself will pull the paper while cutting. The image on the paper can also shift from page to page which is called a bounce, which is generally off by a hairline on an offset press, but can be quite large on lower end equipment such as a copier or a duplicator press. Bleeds are typically an extra 3.175 (18) to 6.35 mm (14 in) to all sides of the card.
Fold-over or "tent" cards, and side fold cards are popular as well. Generally these cards will fold to the standard size.
Apart from common business cards made of paper/card there are also special business cards made from plastic (PVC), especially frosted translucent plastic, crystal clear plastic, white or metallic plastic. Other extraordinary materials are metal, rubberized cards, rubber, magnets, poker chips, wooden nickels, and even real wood. For the most part those special material business cards are of standard format, preferably with rounded corners. These new materials are popular among companies that wish a unique and eye-catching look.

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